By | 21.02.2019

There are why cant managers dating employees consider

What Makes a Good Manager - What Employees Really Need - Shari Harley

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. I run a small company and am wondering what the consequences are of starting up a romantic relationship with one of my employees, and how it will affect my business and relationship with other employees. I know romantic relationships with people who work under you are discouraged, however why are they discouraged? It is a very risky business. Other employees may end up resentful and there will be a drop of productivity if so. Likely you will treat her differently than the others such as giving her information that she in her current position should not have, refusing to see her performance problems, etc.

So in other words Adjust these statistics to your own personal experience. Chances are, however you slice it, you are making a gamble and you do not have the edge. In the US dating in the workplace potentially falls under the case law of sexual harassment.

The issue is basically the following:. Given that potential scenario the companies discourage dating in the workplace to the point of making it a cause for firing an employee. The dating of employees within the company is usually allowed by a special dispensation from Human Resources after a consultation with lawyers.

And usually involves some paperwork to protect the company from scenario I described above. It's a bad idea because you cannot represent the organization's business interests properly in your role as boss, with respect to that person. You are likely to favor that person regardless of their performance in their job. But suppose you ran a very large company. Would you want your lower level managers supervising people who are their significant others?

Or nephews, nieces, cousins,? You mentioned "I run a small company". You are the person most respected in the company. Because if you are in love and want to date and get married that will be great. But just "Romantic relationship which wont la u st long I won't recommend you to go on with such a decision.

To maintain your value in organization, if you still have a huge crush on her, ask her out for a date and tell her things, if you have good thoughts get her a good job in some other company using your contacts.

Then you can date her, she will like you for your gentleness. I'm gonna be very honest and serious with you on this one. It's highly unlikely that the situation will have a good ending. There is a chance but it's a very small chance that things will not end up catastrophically for both or either of you.

A certain level of unprofessionalism will be displayed by one or both of you, which will disturb the workplace and might cause problems with your clients. Please accept this as a very sincerer advice.

Why cant managers dating employees

Looking at the wording of your original question, I'm almost certain that you will display unprofessional behaviour and in turn cause disturbance in the workplace. The OP is asking why it is bad between subordinates, not why it is bad at the work place. The issue is one of perception. Many will perceive that the relationship is not one of mutual, personal romance.

But instead a relationship based on leveraging company opportunities and company money for manager's dating opportunities. If you think that having a poor perception of both your company and your relationship with this person is acceptable, then go for it.

Lastly, keep in mind that some people do come into companies with the open mindedness of dating their coworkers. Others already have relationships or established dating lives or do not want to date anyone. There are many different perspectives and differences in the workplace.

Bare that in mind. Someone people only want to work for your company for money making opportunities only, and will see this as a poor decision. It's not an easy one to make. Because if they don't, and you approach them, the subordinate may rightly think that saying no could harm them professionally.

If pressured to enter a relationship or even just hearing your advances can be considered sexual harassment in most jurisdictions. Regardless of what you think, you hold a position of power over your staff and you must respect that. Unfortunately, what you need to do is nothing. Don't bring it up Even mentioning that you had considered it can cause tension.

Your feelings are your problem, and should be professional enough to not make your staff subject to unwanted advances. There are some good answers here from the company point of view, but look at it from the human point of view, too:. I know I leave a great deal of my personal interests in the parking lot when I arrive to work. I focus on my work and ensuring that I am supporting my coworkers and meeting my objectives. I don't bring much else.

Since you are a business owner, I imagine you are much the same. Your employee may also be the same, meaning everything you see about them "lines up" with you, but you are both likely leaving a huge amount of who you are outside the workplace unexamined.

How do you even know you would be compatible? How could you ever have a relationship of equals when you have power over their means to make a living? The power dynamic in a relationship can get really messed up if there is a disparity in income between the two. You are the income source for the other person. How could you ever hope to have an equal, balanced relationship? You would feel personally betrayed if they took it. They would be resentful if they didn't take it because of this relationship.

No one would ever have a "gripe session" about the company with them. No one would trust them with any confidence, believing and rightfully so they were more loyal to you than anyone else. I'm sure you're the world's greatest boss, but running a business means making your employees unhappy in order to satisfy your customers. That's why you have to pay employees in the first place.

Would you avoid giving them difficult assignments or "problem" customers in order to safeguard your relationship. Maybe not consciously, but it would happen.

Manager and employee fight at Taco Bell!

Your interest is always late, but you cut them some slack because you took them out the evening before and you feel it's partially your fault. Bob isn't getting a fair shake. Now, the only way to fix this is to not work at the same company. Who has to leave and who gets to stay? Who gets to pick? In your case, you and the company are the same thing, but not so in most situations. Say I'm a rock-star senior salesman, been in the biz 20 years and have 5 or 6 million in annual sales that I bring in.

You're an inside sales rep who answers to me supporting my customers. We get serious, and it becomes a problem in the workplace. You would have a hard time finding another job in a slow economy, but I can hop over to "Brand X" and bring at least 2 million in sales with me. Brand X says, "Great.

How do you think your chances of promotion are, now? That's why intra-office dating is never a good idea.

Working with a spouse is another potential disaster, but for entirely different reasons. In the case of two people who happen to be employed by the same company, but don't have any work relationship, it's mostly Ok, at least as long as their relationship is fine, and even after that, if they manage to separate cleanly - which many people manage to do, and if one or both can't, then you had troublesome people anyway.

The exception is companies that are very security conscious, for example a bank, which may have lots of protections against crooked employees, but not against two crooked employees working together.

In the case of supervisor and subordinate: That is asking for serious trouble, because that supervisor is always in danger of giving preferential treatment to their relationship, which then will cause trouble for everyone involved and around them.

So a company will try to split them up. Which will hamper someone's career. Which is Ok-ish if you are getting married I would still have married my wife if it had cost one of us our jobs, and she would have married me , but for a fresh relationship that is very bad. In the case of company owner and subordinate: For the subordinate it's a very dangerous game. Worse than supervisor and subordinate, because there is no HR or boss stopping the company owner, if things go wrong.

For the boss it's a huge opportunity to demonstrate either that he or she is a decent human being, or that he or she is no such thing.

Laws About Relationships Between Employees & Supervisors

In the case of supervisor: So this should only be done if both sides are really, really sure that this is the one. On the other hand, if two people seriously want to be in a relationship, their jobs shouldn't stop them. In that case you both do your best to stay professional while persuing your relationship, and accept the consequences. Home Questions Tags Users Unanswered.

Why are romantic relationships with someone who works under you discouraged? Rachel 6, 8 45 Hi Dave, I've modified your question to address the concerns raised by Chad, and have voted to reopen it. If I've changed it too much from your original question, feel free to edit it further or roll back the changes. That's easy and it can be answered in three words so I won't post it as an actual answer "Conflict of interest". Even if you are "sure" that you can handle things professionally and keep work and social life separated.

Don't forget that a relationship consists of two people. I knew this PhD guy once. His wife was also a PhD in the same field. However, the numbers changed sharply when the dating relationship changed from being between co-workers to being between manager and subordinate percent believed that relationships between superiors and subordinates should be prohibited.

Even in environments where relationships are permitted in the workplace between managers and subordinates, those involved in these relationships need to maintain a professional distance while on the job. Not all relationships last forever, of course, but if and when the relationship between manager and subordinate ends, the work relationship may need to continue.

That can be uncomfortable for both parties as well as for co-workers. Leigh Richards has been a writer since Her work has been published in "Entrepreneur," "Complete Woman" and "Toastmaster," among many other trade and professional publications. She has a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the University of Wisconsin and a Master of Arts in organizational management from the University of Phoenix. Skip to main content. What Will Co-workers Think? Keeping it Professional Even in environments where relationships are permitted in the workplace between managers and subordinates, those involved in these relationships need to maintain a professional distance while on the job.

If the Relationship Ends Not all relationships last forever, of course, but if and when the relationship between manager and subordinate ends, the work relationship may need to continue.

About the Author Leigh Richards has been a writer since

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