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Dating hooked rugs speaking, recommend look

Hooking Rugs with Yarn

Beginning about a century-and-a-half ago, men and women created hooked rugs to warm their hearths and homes. Fabric scraps no longer suitable for clothing were cut into strips and hooked by varying techniques into a burlap ground in patterns. The earliest hooked rugs date from the early-to-midth century; these early rugs are most often found in museums and historical societies. This circa Grenfell Labrador Industries mat depicting a two-masted schooner with red sails and black hull sailing on a blue sea retains its original label and is in very good condition. Dianni auction in Fishkill, N.

While on his journeys as a peddler and after he saw a need for them, Frost made the first pre-stamped patterns on burlap for rug hooking.

As the demand grew and free hand drawing was too labor intensive, he came upon the idea to print the designs from stencils he could make using the metal from old copper boilers. In he started printing them in color. When Frost moved west for his health, James A. Strout bought the Frost business in and ran it until Others soon followed with their patterns and gadgets.

In , Ebenezer Ross of Toledo, Ohio started and invented a gadget called the Novelty Rug Machine that used yarn instead of cut strips of cloth.

This technique today is referred to as needlepunch. Many rug hookers would personalize the patterns and add their own design elements. No rugs from the same pattern would come out the same, given the variety of materials used to make them.

Even so, they were instrumental in limiting originality and creativity though these businesses are credited for popularizing and expanding interest in the craft.

Needlepunched rug likely a Ross pattern c. The last half of the 19th century was a time of rapid change: The Industrial Revolution in America was well on its way. It seemed that the momentum was for more and more, done faster and faster, to be cheaper and cheaper.

As production for consumer goods intensified and prices declined the quality of goods suffered. These were not always bad but often execrable" i. By the end of the 19th century, the popularity of hooked rugs was at an ebb.

Fashions, styles, available time and economic positions had changed. The "quaint" homemade hooked rug would be replaced by the "modern" factory produced carpet. Also now, in reaction to what was seen as the homogenization of the individual and the reduction of man to yet another cog in the industrial process, an anti-modernism movement gained momentum and cottage industries started up to counter what was seen as bad designs made cheaply.

Their purpose was to supply better made and designed rugs to a growing middle class and provide work for those in need. Perhaps the best known of the cottage businesses is the Grenfell Industries. Wilfred Grenfell opened the Grenfell Mission in to help the desperately poor in Newfoundland and Labrador.

As hooking had a long history in Canada, he saw an opportunity for the fishing families to earn some much needed money in the off season by making hooked mats to sell. The earlier rugs were hooked with cotton flannelette and later in the 30s and 40s, with collected and dyed silk and rayon knit hosiery. These rugs today are highly prized and very distinctive in style and subject.

This one was started by Mrs. Alexander Graham Bell and is still in business. With the proliferation of the cottage industries, the homemade rug went out of style until a resurgence of interest in the 30s and 40s. This was in large part thanks to William Winthrop Kent, an architect and hooked rug authority. He felt that old rugs should be saved and hung as art and new ones be made for the floor. About this time Pearl McGowan was also teaching and raising awareness of the craft of rug hooking.

Whereas before, most any type of leftover fabric was used for rug making, now wool became the dominant component. Improvement in the standard of living and an increase in discretionary income for the expanding middleclass, made it feasible for wool to be purchased and dyed specifically for rug making.

Wool became the dominant material in hooked rugs and remains so today. Interest in rug hooking once again seemed to wane in the 50s and 60s as styles changed. Joan Moshimer helped fire up the interest in contemporary rugs with the opening of her hooking business in Kennebunkport, Maine. Rug hooking has gone through many ins and outs of popularity as well as ups and downs in esthetic and technical quality. Today it is once again growing and expanding. Printed designs, cottage industries making finished rugs to order, commercially and hand dyed wools are widely available.

Far surpassing the original bent nail and four boards nailed together for a frame, many tools are now available; designer hooks, cutters, frames and stands. Classes, books, shows, workshops, lectures, seminars, internet posting groups, camps and guilds are multiplying to the ever growing interest and participation in rug hooking.

Museums and galleries are mounting hooked rug shows, recognizing both the old and the contemporary.

There is an amazing and impressive amount of original designing being done today as well. Rug hooking is an example of how a humble craft, born of leftovers and cast off clothing to produce utilitarian goods has blossomed into a medium for textile design and gained recognition as an art form.

Dating hooked rugs

Hooked rugs fill a special need. Like quilts, they are a way to be creative and expressive as well as make something both functional and attractive. Hooked rugs can be a physical registry of the life of the maker. They contain the shirt off their back, the socks from their feet and other materials that had been used up and worn out.

Now they begin a new life. A hooked rug can quite literally give a closet full of information about the maker's station in life.

Wool Art: Antique hooked rugs move from the floor to the wall

Today's rugger may not need to use worn out clothes and cast-offs, though for some it is a choice. The need to create and express one's ideas and designs as well as beautify one's surrounding is a constant in all art forms. Several rug styles can be assigned to specific regions in Canada. Inch mats small squares arranged by color to form a pattern were as common in Nova Scotia, as basket weave patterns were familiar in New Brunswick and as black outlined forms were to Prince Edward Island.

Maple leaves and beavers were a sign of Canadian origin. A sculpted 3-D effect was originally known as "Acadian" now known as the Waldoboro style from the town of the same name in Maine.

Many hookers used elements from their everyday life as inspiration, nautical themes, farm animals, pets and buildings, which might give an idea as to the maker's location. With the spread of patterns through magazines and newspapers the distinctions blended. Tracy's bio and services offered Tracy Jamar has been restoring antique textiles since , where she was head of restoration and conservation services for the well respected gallery, America Hurrah Antiques, NYC.

If they used linen for a foundation, they had already prepared the flax through 20 dexterous manipulations, spun the thread and woven the material on a hand-loom. If their foundation was burlap, it was made of sugar or meal bags, which had first been washed, stretched and pieced together. Early rugs were often original design creations, as unique as the individual. Well-designed hooked rugs made before now command the highest prices at auction.

In addition to their one-of-a-kind folk integrity, W. Auctioneers in Downingtown, Pa. In addition to the striking design and colors, this rug was created on linen, indicating that it was probably made before After that time, burlap bags were so commonly available and well suited for hooking a rug that homespun was seldom used.

Finishing techniques for your hooked rugs

Wherever they began, humble hooked rugs have had a roller coaster ride in popularity. Once largely a rural or perhaps seafaring endeavor, hooking rugs caught fire when commercial patterns popularized the craft after Frost, a Maine tin peddler, collected designs from farm women and stamped hand-colored patterns on burlap with stencils he cut out of large zinc plates between and Hooked rugs declined in popularity during the s when commercial floor coverings became widely accessible.

At the turn of the 20th century, New York decorators began buying hooked rugs for wealthy clients, and Arts and Crafts collectives or philanthropic women like Mrs.

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